Tech Talk

Term Meaning
# If you have been on Twitter, you may have seen a “hashtag.” To put it simply, a hash tag is simply a way for people to search for tweets that have a common topic and to begin a conversation. For example, if you search on #LOST (or #Lost or #lost, because it’s not case-sensitive), you’ll get a list of tweets related to the TV show. What you won’t get are tweets that say “I lost my wallet yesterday” because “lost” isn’t preceded by the hash tag.
1:1 Technology Providing every student with a laptop or tablet to make learning more individualized, increase independence, and extend academics beyond the classroom.
Adaptive Learning 1) Software that adapts its content and pacing to the current knowledge level of the user, so it’s almost like having a personal tailor for your education. 2) An educational process where the teaching methods and materials adapt to each students’ pace and level. Technology is often the vehicle for delivering this process, since software can change exercises, questions, and content easily based on previous answers and actions by a student. For example: Jack is doing well with geometry, but getting a lot of algebra questions wrong. So the app he is using increases the difficulty of the geometry questions while presenting easier algebra questions to help him along.
Asynchronous Learning A student-centered teaching method that uses online resources to facilitate learning without requiring students and instructors
Big Data refers to the massive amounts of data collected over time that are hard to analyze and handle using conventional database management tools. Big Data analytics operate upon a wide range of datasets, from organized to seemingly random, including business transactions, e-mail messages, photos, surveillance videos, and cyber incident activity logs. Scientific data from sensors can reach mammoth proportions over time, and Big Data also includes text posted on the Web, such as blogs and social media. Big Data analytics has traditionally focused on offline processing (download the data and process it locally somewhere). However, advances in computing clouds, analytics, programs, and automation for cyber-physical systems are broadening the applicability of Big Data techniques for use using the conventional Internet and the emerging Industrial Internet.
Blended Learning A teaching practice that combines, or blends, classroom and online learning. The instruction of a lesson occurs with both teacher interaction and computing devices. Also known as Hybrid Learning. For example: Matias learns about algebra is from his teacher, then goes to the computer lab to practice algebra questions using a math program.
Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) Also known as Bring Your Own Technology (BYOT), this is an initiative where students bring their own mobile devices into the classroom for class purposes, as opposed to using school-issued devices. This is often seen as an alternative to 1:1 programs due to lower maintenance costs, though students without devices cannot participate. For example: Li Ting brings her Android phone to class everyday for use as a clicker because of her school’s BYOD program.
Bring Your Own Technology (BYOT) Also known as Bring Your Own Device (BYOD), this is an initiative where students bring their own mobile devices into the classroom for class purposes, as opposed to using school-issued devices. This is often seen as an alternative to 1:1 programs due to lower maintenance costs, though students without devices cannot participate. For example: Li Ting brings her Android phone to class everyday for use as a clicker because of her school’s BYOD program.
BYOD Synonymous with Bring Your Own Device
BYOT Synonymous with Bring Your Own Technology
Clickers Synonymous with Student Response Systems. Sometimes also called Classroom Response Systems or, more generically, Audience Response Systems. A device or mobile app that allows students to answer a multiple-choice question. The teacher presents a question to the class, then students use their clickers to input their answer. Some use this as an alternative to paper quizzes.
Cloud A generic term used to represent the concept of distributed computing – where a set of networked computers allow for shared services. Also used synonymously with the Internet.
Cloud Computing A generic term that refers to the computer hardware and software that powers the cloud. This includes servers (a computer with specialized software on it), data storage, applications, and more. For example: This is another buzzword that is often used improperly and inconsistently. You can simply think of it as “a huge collection of computers around the world that allow me to do all the cool things that I can do on the Internet.” For example: This is another buzzword that is often used improperly and inconsistently. You can simply think of it as “a huge collection of computers around the world that allow me to do all the cool things that I can do on the Internet.”
Cloud Storage has become ubiquitous when talking about managing one’s growing cache of information, media and other data. The idea here is that your data is hosted by a third party, presumably secure and accessible anywhere you have an internet connection. The concept of a ‘cloud’ means many different resources connected together acting as one, thus increasing redundancy (and conceivably reliability) by creating many copies of data and storing it in many places. More copies in more places generate a potential security issue. If I store my file cabinet in your office, anyone with access to your office can get to my file cabinet. How good is your office door lock? Are you telling me the truth? Which files am I now comfortable storing in that file cabinet? These are the issues facing popular cloud storage services like Dropbox, Google Drive and iCloud.
COIL Synonymous with Collaborative Online International Learning
Collaborative Online International Learning Online collaborative international courses. COIL builds bridges between study abroad, instructional design and teaching faculty through team-taught courses, thereby promoting, integrating and enhancing international education experiences across the curriculum
Cookie(s) Describes a small piece of information about you
Course Management System (CMS) Class websites can be a big undertaking. A CMS keeps teachers and students organized with digital resources for class discussion, document management, homework submission, and course scheduling.
Differentiated Learning Programs or tools to present learning materials in creative ways that match every student’s individual learning style, from typical lectures to fun games and quizzes. Though the tools used depend on the student, the learning goals are the same for all.
Digital Citizenship Digital citizenship means making good use of the Internet and having knowledge of how to operate web-connected devices safely while online. It also means that you can effectively use technology to interact responsibly with others to engage in society, politics, or other public discussion.
Digital Classroom A classroom that mostly or entirely relies on electronic devices and software instead of paper and pens. It is usually characterized by a central computing device, like a laptop or tablet, and a number of online software and apps.
Digital Divide The term digital divide is used to refer to a large gap in technology use between two groups. The two groups can be divided along economic, racial, age, or even gender lines. For example, Americans 55 and older report using the Internet the least out of all age groups, while those 18-24 report using the Internet the most . This could be said to be a “digital divide.” In education specifically, the “digital divide” most often refers to a divide in technology use along economic lines.
Digital Literacy Digital literacy is the ability to effectively and critically navigate, evaluate, and create information using a range of digital technologies. For example, you know your Aunt Sue who always forwards you those emails because she thinks she’d be cursed otherwise? She wouldn’t exactly be digitally literate. On the other hand, someone who knows not to trust everything they read online or who knows how to edit an article on Wikipedia might be called digitally literate.
Digital Native An individual born during or after the common use of digital technologies, such as the Internet, mobile devices, apps, etc. It is assumed that such individuals have a strong grasp of digital technology because it was a regular part of their lives.
Digital Story Telling Once upon a time (2012), there were students and instructors who used digital tools to tell exciting stories in educational ways, like showing off research or building course assignments.
Down Time This expression refers to lost production time due to a broken machine and its operator
e-Books Put down your highlighters and Post-Its, e-books are completely digital and are usually read on computers or e-readers.
e-Learning A web-based learning environment that allows instructors and students to interact through the computer without worrying about time or place.
Education Technology Any kind of technology that is used for educational purposes by an educator or educational institution. Most commonly used in reference to software utilized in primary, secondary, and higher education, though it can cover much more than that. Also known as “edtech”.
Edupunk An attitude where learning can happen on your own, without any formal structure. Often described as “do-it-yourself (DIY) education.” Interestingly, the originator of this term, Jim Groom, no longer calls himself an edupunk. For example: Jim is an edupunk because he doesn’t play by the rules; he builds his own materials rather than pay for commercial products.
Electronic Classroom A classroom equipped with multimedia devices to enhance the learning experience.
Flipped Classroom A form of blended learning, this is the practice of students watching lecture material (usually in video form) at home, then practicing their learnings in an interactive environment in the classroom. Households without computers or an Internet connection cannot participate in this practice, however.
GAFE This acronym stands for “Google Apps for Education,” a popular Internet-based suite of applications designed specifically for schools. It features email, document creation and collaboration, and many other tools that districts find useful.
Gamification The practice of applying game mechanics into an activity. Examples of game mechanics are goals, badges, competition, immediate feedback, and leveling up.
To Google To look something up on the Internet. Originally refers to using the Google Internet browser to look up the information.
Hashtag If you have been on Twitter, you may have seen a “hashtag.” To put it simply, a hash tag is simply a way for people to search for tweets that have a common topic and to begin a conversation. For example, if you search on #LOST (or #Lost or #lost, because it’s not case-sensitive), you’ll get a list of tweets related to the TV show. What you won’t get are tweets that say “I lost my wallet yesterday” because “lost” isn’t preceded by the hash tag.
Hot Spot In the world of IT this term refers to places that have wireless Internet connections
Hybrid Learning Synonymous with Blended Learning. See the Blended Learning definition above.
Individualized Learning When a group of students all receive the same content but work through it all at their own pace — anything from slow and steady to fast and furious.
Informal Learning Learning that occurs outside a traditional school, i.e. forget having to lug around that heavy backpack.
Information & Communications Technology (ICT) A field related to Information Technology (IT). Used by some as synonymous with IT, and by others as more expansive than IT, since it includes communication technologies as well. In the US, IT is more commonly used within schools, while ICT is more common in the UK.
Instructional Technology Combining education and technology to enhance a curriculum. Instructors can alter how they deliver content to students depending on the technology available at their school.
Interface In a general sense, it is the portion of a program that interacts between a user and an application, meaning it is what you see on the computer screen.
LMS Synonomous with Learning Management System
Learning Management System (LMS) A piece of software that manages, analyzes, and runs educational courses and training programs. Also included are student registration, curriculum management, skill & competency management, and reporting features. Most modern LMS packages are web-based. For example: Ms. Kensington is deciding between Moodle, Blackboard, Desire2Learn, and Schoology for managing her teachers’ curriculum materials and students’ assessments.
Learning Platform An interactive online service organized around a specific topic that gives users the ability to submit and receive information and learning materials.
Legacy Media Media that is considered “old,” such as radio, television, and especially newspapers
Lifelong Learning There’s no rule that says learning stops after a certain age. Lifelong learning continues education informally for personal enrichment, usually after finishing formal education.
LMS LMS is short for Learning Management System. An LMS is a piece of software that is capable administering, documenting, and tracking classroom activities. Teachers and staff often use LMS’s to make their work more efficient, as well as to increase student engagement. Schoologyis one example of an LMS.
M-Learning Short for “mobile learning”, m-learning simply means any learning activity that takes place on a mobile device.The word “mobile” is also relative; it could mean a laptop, a tablet, or something even smaller and more mobile, like a cellphone.
Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) A course in which materials and instruction are delivered over the internet to users around the world. The course is designed to connect instructors with learners interested in a common topic and works best with a large user-base and open content.
MOOC A course in which materials and instruction are delivered over the internet to users around the world. The course is designed to connect instructors with learners interested in a common topic and works best with a large user-base and open content.
Multitasking The simultaneous execution of more than one task. a computer that launches or runs more than one program simultaneously is multitasking
One-to-One (1:1) Most commonly refers to a program where a school provides one device (e.g. laptop, tablet, etc) per student. This is a new initiative and a lot of conflicting reports exist citing its advantages and disadvantages. Many K-12 schools are currently running 1:1 pilots to test this concept. For example: Andy’s school gave him an iPad to use for the entire school year as part of their 1:1 iPad program.
(1:1) Most commonly refers to a program where a school provides one device (e.g. laptop, tablet, etc) per student. This is a new initiative and a lot of conflicting reports exist citing its advantages and disadvantages. Many K-12 schools are currently running 1:1 pilots to test this concept. For example: Andy’s school gave him an iPad to use for the entire school year as part of their 1:1 iPad program.
Online Lab Students learn almost exclusively online, and do so while logging in from a physical school setting. No lab coat or goggles required.
open educational resource (OER) Digital materials available for reuse and repurposing in teaching, researching, and learning. These materials are made available through open licenses that allow them to be used through means not permitted under copyright, so the flow of knowledge is boundless.
Open Source Software Any piece of software that is freely available and openly licensed. Other programmers can contribute to the original software or create their own versions of it. Most modern websites incorporate some kind of open source software, including edshelf!
Opt-Out Any time a user requests to be removed from any kind of online program, he or she is said to be “opting out.” For example, if you no longer want to receive an e-mail newsletter, you have the ability to opt-out. Note that there is a difference between opting out and unsubscribing. You may only unsubscribe to something you have previously subscribed to, but you may opt-out of something you have never even joined in the first place. For example, if you fill out an online form to register or sign up for something, you may see a “yes” automatically checked in a radio button to indicate that you wish to receive something. Unless you manually uncheck the yes, you will be added to some kind of marketing list. – See more at: http://www.netlingo.com/word/opt-out.php#sthash.0ONfkdtw.dpuf
PDFing An example of a word morphing, this term once described the process of turning a document into an Adobe PDF (Portable Document Format) file
Podcast A podcast is similar to a radio show: they’re audio-only “shows” distributed not via radio waves, but via the Internet. There are podcasts on an unlimited number of topics, and many are educational and appropriate for students. Check out our favorites in these two posts.
Personalized Learning Unfortunately not all about monogrammed notebooks and book bags — it’s learning entirely geared toward the individual student. The content, pace, structure, and goals of instruction vary depending on the student’s learning habits.
Photoshopped A play on the word “Photoshop,” the software graphics program created by Adobe, it refers to anything being “touched up” or digitally manipulated.
PING or Ping Traditionally this term refers to an Internet program used to determine whether a specific IP address is accessible or online. It works by sending a packet to the specified address and waiting for a reply. PING (pronounced “ping” as in the game “ping pong”) is used primarily to troubleshoot Internet connections. In addition, PING reports how many hops are required to connect two Internet hosts. There are both freeware and shareware PING utilities available for PCs. Like many great technology terms, this term has morphed into a different spelling and meaning. Seen in email or text messages as “ping me when you get a chance” (not written in ALL CAPS like the acronym) it is used as slang for getting someone’s attention.
Plug-and-Play Most computer systems are now designed to be plug-and-play, so that you can buy it, bring it home, plug it in, and start playing. Also slang for “easy to set up”
Plugged In Slang for wired, or being connected to something
QR Code Have you ever seen one of those weird square boxes that looks like it’s full of static? That’s a QR code! It’s sort of like a barcode, and it can hold almost any text, links, or information you want. When you scan the code it usually opens a webpage.
Scaleable or Scalability Refers to the ability of hardware or software or even a brand, to adapt to increased demands while continuing to work accurately. It also describes how well a solution to some problem will work when the size of the problem increases at a later time. For example, in the industry, developers are commonly concerned with building Web sites that are scaleable and with setting up an infrastructure that is able to grow.
Spam An e-mail message sent to a large number of people without consent, also known as Unsolicited Commercial E-mail (UCE) or junk e-mail.
Student Information System (SIS) A piece of software that manages student data. This includes grades, attendance, background information, discpline records, health records, etc. For example: As the school counselor, Mr. Rankin uses their SIS to pull Joey’s disciplinary record.
Student Response Systems Synonymous with Clickers. Sometimes also called Classroom Response Systems or, more generically, Audience Response Systems. See the Clickers definition above.
Surf or Surfing To browse or look at information on the Web by pointing and clicking and navigating various websites
Synchronous Online Learning A real-time learning situation in which immediate, two-way communication between instructor and participants in possible.
Thread Originally it referred to a chain of postings on a single subject in a newsgroup. Most newsreaders include a command that lets you follow a thread by jumping to the next related message (rather than reviewing all the messages in order). Popular newsreaders also have a thread selector that allows you to sort articles by threads; indentation is often used to indicate a response to an article positioned above it.
Unplugged Slang for being not connected. The opposite of wired.
User A term that defines the online audience, it also refers to anyone who “uses” a computer.
Virtual Classroom An online space where students and instructors interact. Not to be confused with a video game, though engagement definitely improves if students think of it as one.
Virtual Learning Environment An education system online that mimics real-world education by using virtual concepts for exams, assignments, classes, and more.
Wiki A wiki is a website that allows anyone to add, modify, or delete information from it. Wikipedia is one of these, hence it’s name. Wikis are often used to develop encyclopedia-like knowledge bases on particular topics, like math or even video games. Many schools use wikis for internal projects and student websites.

Sources
http://quizlet.com/18034399/educational-technology-terms-flash-cards/
http://www.netlingo.com
https://edshelf.com/education-technology-dictionary
http://news.yahoo.com/10-tech-terms-for-2014-142337446.html
http://www.urbandictionary.com/
http://www.fractuslearning.com/2013/03/04/technology-terms-for-teachers/

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